Friday, 2 October 2020

September phytochemicals! Why are shrimp and flamingos pink?

Happy #PhytochemicalFriday! Today's suggestion from @YankeeLady76. Spilanthol: a fatty amide from the 'electric daisy' Acmella oleracea. Chewing the plant's flowers releases spilanthol into the mouth, causing a tingling, static-like sensation. Signature cocktail ingredient!

Happy #PhytochemicalFriday! Today: alpha-Eleostearic acid, the primary component of tung oil - a wood finish that is believed to have been used since before the common era. The oil is harvested from Vernicia fordii (Euphorbiaceae!?) - a tree with separate male and female flowers.
Happy #PhytochemicalFriday! Today: miraculin - a glycoprotein from the miracle fruit Synsepalum dulcificum (Sapotaceae; Ericales). It binds to sweetness receptors on the tongue and makes normally sour-tasting food seem sweet, inspiring the name 'miracle berry'. Try it out!
Happy #PhytochemicalFriday! Why are flamingos and shrimp pink? Astaxanthin - a blood-red ketocarotenoid made by microalgae that makes its way up the food chain to chordates and arthropods (among others), giving them a pink hue. An important molecule to consider in aquaculture.

3 comments:

  1. "Dear Admin,
    I am Jamal Lloyd Johnson. Very informative post! I am thankful to you for providing this unique information.
    Jamal Lloyd Johnson
    Apollo Management:Mail: 1236 N. Sweetzer Ave, unit 17
    West Hollywood, CA 90069
    Jamal Lloyd Johnson
    Jamal Lloyd Johnson
    Jamal Lloyd Johnson
    Jamal Lloyd Johnson"

    ReplyDelete
  2. Raintree Nursery to equip you to have all the resources to make our home beautiful, healthy & fresh with plants that will also increase the curb appeal of our home and garden. Visit to buy olive trees online.

    ReplyDelete